International collaboration

Department of International Collaboration (DIC) was established in 2003 to coordinate the international projects at Haukeland University Hospital (HUH), and to relieve clinical personnel from administrative work.

The aim is to have academically broad engagements with a few, public hospitals in Africa and Asia.

More about the department

More than 30 departments and units at HUH are engaged in international health projects, and 15-25 staff members are working abroad in the projects at any given time.

DIC is administrative responsible for the international projects. The department assists in writing applications and reports to external donor organizations, and provides updated information about the collaborating countries. DIC also has the official communication with donors and Norwegian Embassies abroad, and is responsible for the personnel working abroad on the different projects.

In addition to funding from external donors, DIC receives an annual allocation from HUH to support the international engagements.

A strategy for International Collaboration was approved by the HUH Board in 2010. The strategy focuses on long-term commitments to selected, public health institutions in Africa and Asia, where the aim is competence building in a win-win perspective for all the involved institutions.

Employees

Jon Wigum Dahl - Head of Department
Office: +47 55 97 33 60
Mobile: +47 95 89 05 39
E-mail: jon.wigum.dahl@helse-bergen.no
Mr. Dahl has been employed since the department was established in 2003. His background is as a political scientist, and previously he worked seven years in ILO/UN service in Geneva, Switzerland and Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Mr. Dahl was also manager for Health and social services Fusa Municipality, coordinator for internationalization in the city of Bergen, and office manager at Center for International Health, University of Bergen.


Stener Kvinnsland – Senior adviser
Office: +47 55 97 21 56
E-mail: stener.kvinnsland@helse-bergen.no
Dr. Kvinnsland has been employed at HUS since 2002, first as Head of Department of Oncology, then as deputy CEO from 2003, and later as CEO from 2007 until the end of August 2015. He is an oncology specialist, and has a long, clinical and scientific career within his field. He is also chairman of the board for Oslo University Hospital and leader of Norwegian Health Network for Development. In his time as CEO of HUH, he has been very dedicated and involved in the department’s projects, and will now continue in a part-time position where he will follow up the existing projects at DIC; keep contact with donors and collaborating hospitals in Africa and Asia; and contribute to develop new projects and programs at DIC.


Grete Marie Eilertsen – Senior Program Coordinator
Office: +47 55 97 47 69
Mobile: +47 97 95 77 23
E-mail: grete.marie.eilertsen@helse-bergen.no
Ms. Eilertsen has been employed since the department was established in 2003. She has a master in Development Geography/Social Science from the University of Bergen. She is responsible for the HR management, and for Haukeland University Hospital’s projects in Malawi, Ethiopia, Tanzania/Zanzibar and Nepal. In addition she is administrative Coordinator for the emergency team at Haukeland University Hospital (HUH).


Silje Seterås – Senior Program Coordinator
Office: +47 55 97 33 70
Mobile: +47 97 11 00 06
E-mail: silje.seteraas@helse-bergen.no
Ms. Seterås has been employed since 2004. Her background is within business and administration from Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology. She is responsible for external funded projects in Tanzania/Zanzibar and Nepal, and is the finance coordinator at the department.


Camilla Skjelbred – Executive officer
Office: +47 55 97 21 56
Mobile: +47 90 97 19 27
E-mail: camilla.skjelbred@helse-bergen.no
Ms. Skjelbred has been employed since 2014. She has a bachelor degree in economics and management, with a major in business administration from Bergen University College. She is responsible for the shipment of containers to our projects, and she is assisting in the finance management of DIC; providing practical support to the international FK participants at HUH; maintaining updated webpages; and in general support the running of the office.


Donations

Many people wish to contribute to our projects in terms of monetary donations, or knitted wear for newborns. Please contact us for further information.

LION – Lilongwe Institute of Orthopedics and Neurosurgery

In Malawi it is estimated that more than 5.000 people die in traffic accidents every year, more than 100.000 are injured, and the numbers are rapidly increasing. About 10.000 people are permanently disabled because of the lack of modern trauma care. Malawi cannot meet this challenge without external support due to limited resources. We wish to change the future for the injured, to help them receive proper trauma care, and rehabilitation back to a normal life.

Read more about the orthopedic project

This is how you can support the project

Treatment for children with cancer in Nepal

The Department for children with cancer at Haukeland University Hospital (HUH) has started a collaboration with a children’s hospital in Nepal, Kanti Children’s Hospital (KCH). This is a public hospital with 320 beds, where 28 of them are for children with cancer. The department at KCH is in great need of upgrading their infrastructure, including new beds for the children and a waiting area for relatives. The family and relatives of the child must pay 50% of the total cost for treatment, but many return home without the treatment because they cannot afford it. If you wish to support this project, the money will go towards infrastructure and cancer treatment for the children.

Read more about our projects in Nepal

Knitting for newborns

Haukeland University Hospital started their engagements with Mnazi Mmoja Hospital (MMH) in Zanzibar within the field of pediatrics in 2011. Both the Women’s Clinic and the Children’s Clinic are involved in the project. In Malawi we had a collaboration with the Maternity Clinic at Bwaila Hospital from 2007. The project in Malawi has ended, but we still send knitted garments to the clinic. Since the startup of these projects we have received thousands of caps, socks, blankets and sweaters for the hospitals. Newborns lose heath through their head, and they use the knitted wear to keep them warm.

Read more about our project in pediatrics