Selvrapportert helse og søvnproblemer hos pasienter i primærhelsetjenesten


Forskere fra Universitetet i Bergen har i denne studien undersøkt assosiasjonen mellom pasientens selvrapporterte helse og søvnproblemer, somatiske helseplager og utfordringer i mellommenneskelige forhold.

Factors associated with self-rated health in primary care


Thomas Mildestvedt, Vibeke V. Herikstad, Ida Undheim, Bjørn Bjorvatn &
Eivind Meland

Studien er publisert i Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care

ABSTRACT

Background: Self-rated health (SRH) measures one's current general health and is a widely used health indicator. Sleep problems, somatic health complaints, and unmet needs in interpersonal relationships are suspected to influence SRH, but studies in primary health care settings are sparse.Objective: To examine the associations between patients' self-rated health and their sleep problems, somatic health complaints, and unmet needs in interpersonal relationships.Design: We collected data via questionnaires for this cross-sectional study from general practice.Setting: Primary health care in Norway. Subjects: 1302 consecutive patients participated. Main outcome measures: The questionnaire included a single question about SRH, the Bergen Insomnia Scale (BIS), five questions on somatic health complaints, and three questions from the Basic Psychological Needs Scale (BPNS) pertaining to the relationships domain. We analyzed our data using ordinal logistic regression models. Results: Our response rate was 74%. The prevalence of fair/poor SRH was 26%, with no gender differences. We revealed a significant association between increasing age and reduced SRH. The study showed that sleep problems and somatic health complaints were strongly associated with SRH, and unmet needs in relationships were also significantly and independently associated with reduced SRH in a full model analysis. Conclusion: Sleep problems, somatic health complaints, and unmet needs in interpersonal relationships were all associated with reduced SRH. These factors are all modifiable and could be managed both within and outside a primary care setting in order to improve SRH.